Earning their keep? Fostering, education and work in Tanzania

Sophie Hedges was asked to write up one of her PhD papers for the IUSSP online magazine, N-IUSSP. Here’s a summary: “Fostering is common throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but the motivations for fostering and consequences for fostered children remain unclear. In northern Tanzania, Sophie Hedges, Rebecca Sear, Jim Todd, Mark Urassa, and David W. Lawson find that fostered children suffer minimal educational disadvantages, even when orphaned, and argue that strong family networks and children’s work contributions make fostering beneficial for foster carers and children alike.”

http://www.niussp.org/article/earning-their-keep-fostering-education-and-work-in-tanzania/

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Tips for good practice in peer review

Rebecca Sear was asked to write up some ‘tips for good practice in peer review’ for the Royal Society website for peer review week: “The theme of Peer Review Week 2019 is ‘Quality in peer review’. We spoke to Dr Rebecca Sear, Head of the Department of Population Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and member of the Editorial Board of our journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, about this topic. Rebecca has developed a training course on ‘Good practice in peer review,’ which she presents to students at her institution.”

Tips for good practice in peer review

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Girls Who Grow Up Without Their Father Start Their Periods Earlier, Or Do They?

Girls Who Grow Up Without Their Father Start Their Periods Earlier, Or Do They?

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Trade-offs between work, school and play in Tanzania

Sophie’s latest blog post touches on important demographic, economic and development issues prevalent in most low-income countries today, and how modernization is impacting the role of children in two villages in north-western Tanzania. Look out for the very informative infographic and her fieldwork pictures!

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The UK’s breastfeeding problem: a societal issue with an environmental solution?

Laura discusses one aspect of her PhD research in this blog-post on breast-feeding in the UK. She focuses on the importance of studying women’s environmental quality as a predictor for initiating and maintaining breast-feeding, as well as the ‘subtler barriers’ behind the breastfeeding-specific barriers that have recently been brought to attention by organizations such as UNICEF.

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