Views from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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Protest in Brazil

Can shifting social norms tackle the sexual exploitation of girls in Rio’s favelas?

Ligia Kiss Ben CislaghiBy Dr Ligia Kiss, Lecturer in Social Epidemiology and Dr Ben Cislaghi, Lecturer in social norms at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. In a favela in Rio de Janeiro recently, a 16-year-old girl woke up in a house she did not know, surrounded by more than thirty men, some armed, who claimed to have had sex with her. She did not remember what had happened after going to her boyfriend’s house the night before. After waking up from a drug-induced state of unconsciousness, she went home wearing men’s clothes and didn’t mention anything to her family. Read more

Worker in sugarcane field. Credit: iStock/alffoto

Why are thousands of sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua dying from chronic kidney disease?

Dr Marvin GonzalezBy Dr Marvin Gonzalez, Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; and Research Centre on Health, Work and Environment at the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua-León. In the sugarcane fields of Nicaragua, young men work in the scorching heat for 8-12 hours a day cutting down lofty canes with a machete. It’s backbreaking work – in a typical shift they may lose more than 2kg in body weight. The men drink water or electrolyte drinks and take respite in the shade when they can, but this is often not possible. Such physically demanding work can be expected to have a toll. But increasingly worrying numbers of them are being struck down with chronic kidney disease of unknown cause, a long-term condition which will eventually take many of their lives. Read more

Empowerhack montage - credit Kriselda Rabino

Empowerhack: inclusive humanitarian crises tech with a focus on women

By Charlotte Seeley-Musgrave (MSc Public Health) and Jessica Morely (Chayn / Empowerhack). In 2015, the news of the mass displacement of over 4.6 million refugees from Syria prompted a spectacular response from across the globe. Volunteer technology communities came together to create digital solutions tailored to refugee needs, including virtual schools, social integration initiatives, and many more. Read more

Medical exam Credit: Jan Ribeiro/Pref.Olinda

Zika: Q&A with Prof Laura Rodrigues

Prof Laura RodriguesLaura Rodrigues, Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, is studying mothers and babies affected by Zika virus in Brazil. (Interview by Robert Colville.) Read more

A fieldworker interviews a mother with her young baby. Credit: Karen Edmond

Are home visits a cost-effective way to prevent deaths in newborn babies?

catherine_pittBy Catherine Pitt, Lecturer in Health Economics at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Babies born in poor countries can be 50 times more likely to die in their first month of life than babies born in rich countries. In the safest country in the world for newborns, Japan, 1 of every 1000 newborn babies die in their first four weeks of life. In the United Kingdom, 3 of every 1000 newborn babies die. But in Sierra Leone, the most dangerous country for newborns, 50 of every 1000 newborn babies die in their first month – one death for every 20 babies born. Read more

Image: Children working on field in Vietnam. Credit: ILO/Truong Huu Hung

Migrant children who don’t make the front page

Dr Cathy ZimmermanBy Dr Cathy Zimmerman, Reader in Gender Violence and Health at the School. The recent image of the body of a dead three-old boy on a Turkish beach seized the world’s attention and provoked the worst nightmare of parents everywhere. This photo, which warrants the international outrage it has received, sadly only hints at the full panorama of childhood horrors that occur around the world each day. In recent months while one migration crisis has followed another, alongside and worlds away from the children fleeing bullets and bombs, are unseen millions of girls and boys who are also suffering aborted childhoods and forced to navigate a universe of adult perils in the form of forced and trafficked child labour. But, what happens to the children who survive these abuses? Read more

blind_resized for Chariot

“When the patients share their joy of regaining sight with you then that is double joy”

Inspirational film released to mark the day Queen Elizabeth II becomes the longest serving monarch. Read more

HPV vaccines in Brazil. Credit Gabriel Jabur/Agência Brasília

Could a single dose of HPV vaccine be enough?

Mark JitBy Dr Mark Jit, Senior Lecturer in Vaccine Epidemiology. Year 8 schoolgirls in the UK (12-13 years old) receive two doses each of a vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus that causes cervical cancer as well as genital warts and a number of other unpleasant cancers. Until 2013, they received three doses of the vaccine each. Read more

Drip stands at the Kerry Town the Ebola treatment centre. Credit: Ankur Gupta-Wright

Improving the clinical care of Ebola patients

Dr Ankur Gupta-WrightBy Dr Ankur Gupta-Wright, Clinical Research Fellow at the School.  Recent positive results from the Guinea Ebola vaccine trial, which suggested a vaccine could provide high protection against the virus, were welcome news. However, it’s also essential that we continue to carry out research to ensure Ebola patients are receiving appropriate care and effective treatment. Read more

KS_wide

School tops research league tables in 2015 Leiden Ranking

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has been ranked top university in Europe for research impact in all fields (ahead of Oxford and Cambridge) in the 2015 CWTS Leiden Ranking.  The School is also ranked 6th overall in the world for impact based on the top 1% of published papers in all fields (after MIT, Harvard, Caltech, Stanford and Berkeley), 3rd in the world for biomedical and health sciences (after only MIT and Caltech) and 5th in the world overall for collaborative research. Read more