News from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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HPV vaccines in Brazil. Credit Gabriel Jabur/Agência Brasília

Could a single dose of HPV vaccine be enough?

Mark JitBy Dr Mark Jit, Senior Lecturer in Vaccine Epidemiology. Year 8 schoolgirls in the UK (12-13 years old) receive two doses each of a vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV), a virus that causes cervical cancer as well as genital warts and a number of other unpleasant cancers. Until 2013, they received three doses of the vaccine each. Read more

Drip stands at the Kerry Town the Ebola treatment centre. Credit: Ankur Gupta-Wright

Improving the clinical care of Ebola patients

Dr Ankur Gupta-WrightBy Dr Ankur Gupta-Wright, Clinical Research Fellow at the School.  Recent positive results from the Guinea Ebola vaccine trial, which suggested a vaccine could provide high protection against the virus, were welcome news. However, it’s also essential that we continue to carry out research to ensure Ebola patients are receiving appropriate care and effective treatment. Read more

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School tops research league tables in 2015 Leiden Ranking

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has been ranked top university in Europe for research impact in all fields (ahead of Oxford and Cambridge) in the 2015 CWTS Leiden Ranking.  The School is also ranked 6th overall in the world for impact based on the top 1% of published papers in all fields (after MIT, Harvard, Caltech, Stanford and Berkeley), 3rd in the world for biomedical and health sciences (after only MIT and Caltech) and 5th in the world overall for collaborative research. Read more

Teacher and pupil using LTK

School-based first aid kit for malaria named among 25 innovative solutions to global health problems

A programme that trains teachers to manage uncomplicated malaria in school children in Malawi has been recognised by the WHO’s Social Innovation in Health Initiative. Read more

Child survival in Tanzania soars but mothers and newborns left behind

Mother with baby in Tanzania  by Jordi Matas for Save the ChildrenTanzania has achieved Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 for child survival, but there has been insufficient progress in reducing maternal and newborn deaths in the country, according to a case study published in The Lancet Global Health to mark International Day of the African Child. The country was selected as a Countdown to 2015 case study, in which researchers collected and analysed the best available data from 1990 (MDG baseline) to 2014. They assessed changes in maternal, newborn and child mortality, looked at the reasons behind these changes, and identified which groups were being left behind. Read more

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Why do rates of partner violence vary between locations?

Intimate partner violence (physical or sexual harm by a current or former partner or spouse) affects nearly one in three women worldwide within their lifetime, but this can vary hugely between countries and even neighbourhoods. New research from the School and the University of Oslo has revealed underlying gender factors, which may help to explain this diverse geographical distribution and advise future prevention measures. Read more

Peter Piot to receive DIA’s Global Inspire Award

Peter Piot portrait - credit Heidi LarsonProfessor Peter Piot, Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, is to be honored with a Global Inspire Award by DIA (the Drug Information Association) for his significant and innovative contributions to advancing global health.  Read more

Charlotte Watts elected to Fellowship of Academy of Medical Sciences

Professor Charlotte Watts has been elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences, in recognition of her excellence in medical research. Prof Charlotte Watts This year, 48 new Fellows were elected for their contribution to the advancement of medical science. Prof Watts follows Prof Eleanor Riley, who was elected into the Fellowship this time last year. Professor Sir John Tooke PMedSci, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences said: “The Academy of Medical Sciences champions the excellence and diversity of medical science in the UK, and this is clearly demonstrated in this year’s cohort of new Fellows. Their election is a much deserved honour, and I know they will contribute greatly to the Academy. I am delighted to welcome them all to the Fellowship, and look forward to working with them in the future.” Read more

AIDS Between Science and Politics

AIDS Between Science and Politics coverThe School’s Director, Prof Peter Piot charts the social, political and human history of the AIDS epidemic in his newly released book, AIDS Between Science and Politics, which also looks at the ongoing challenges in tackling the disease. Prof Piot, who was the founding executive director of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), recounts his experience as a clinician, scientist, and activist tackling the disease from its onset in the early 1980s to today. The AIDS pandemic was not only disruptive to the health of millions worldwide, but also fractured international relations, global access to new technologies, and public health policies in nations across the globe. As he struggled to get ahead of the disease, Prof Piot found science does little good when it operates independently of politics and economics, and politics is worthless if it rejects scientific evidence and respect for human rights. Read more

The key to finding and supporting children with disabilities

Cover of 'Using the Key Informant Method: A Working Guide'A new tool to help identify children with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries and ensure they get the support they need has been published. The free resource from researchers at the International Centre for Evidence in Disability at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine provides an evidence-based guide and materials to identify children in an affordable and reliable way using community volunteers. Read more