News from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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The key to finding and supporting children with disabilities

Cover of 'Using the Key Informant Method: A Working Guide'A new tool to help identify children with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries and ensure they get the support they need has been published. The free resource from researchers at the International Centre for Evidence in Disability at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine provides an evidence-based guide and materials to identify children in an affordable and reliable way using community volunteers. Read more

Domestic violence deters contraception

Condoms-300 Women who are abused by their partner or ex-partner are much less likely to use contraception, exposing them to sexually transmitted diseases and leading to more frequent unplanned pregnancies and abortions, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. Read more

Image: Anne Mills lights the holy lamp at the launch of the CCCC in India. Credit: PHFI

First of its kind Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions launched in India

A new international partnership has launched in India to tackle the growing health crisis of chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and mental illness. The Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions (CCCC) is a partnership between four leading institutions: the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences New Delhi, Emory University, and the Public Health Foundation of India. The School’s Professor Vikram Patel is one of the Centre’s Directors. Read more

Image: Ebola virus. Credit: CDC

Independent panel on the global response to Ebola

The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the Harvard Global Health Institute have convened an Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola. The Panel is holding its inaugural meeting in Boston this weekend. It will analyse the major weaknesses in the global health system exposed by the Ebola outbreak, and offer workable recommendations for medium-to-long-term institutional changes required to address them. Read more

Image: Scanning electron micrograph of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, which cause TB. Credit: Flicker/NIAID.

How can we reach, treat and cure everyone with TB?

Progress against tuberculosis (TB) is being threatened by drug resistance and all patients with the disease should be tested to find out which treatments they respond to, according to a publication in the BMJ. As World TB Day approaches with this year’s theme of “reaching, treating and curing everyone”, David Moore, Professor of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and co-authors James Millard and Cesar Ugarte-Gil set out current challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and control of multidrug resistant tuberculosis globally. Read more

Two Syrian women wait to collect a prescription at a health clinic in Bekaa Valley Lebanon - credit Flickr/Russell Watkins/Department for International Development

Responding to non-communicable diseases in the Syrian health crisis

As the health situation of internally displaced people and refugees in Syria continues to deteriorate, experts in humanitarian crises and conflict from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine are calling for urgent action on the issue of non-communicable diseases. Writing in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine with colleagues from the Syrian American Medical Society in the US and the American University of Beirut in Lebanon, Dr Karl Blanchet and Dr Adam Coutts from the School say that while much focus has been on disorders such as leishmaniasis and poliomyelitis, many less visible and untreated non-communicable disorders – such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and mental health issues – are also highly prevalent in Syria and have caused the deaths and disability of thousands. Read more

Prof Martin MvKee is awarded the 2015 Donabedian International Award

Martin McKee receives healthcare excellence award

Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the School, has been presented with the 2015 Donabedian International Award for his contribution to healthcare excellence at a ceremony in the Palau de la Música de Barcelona. Read more

Mother-to-child transmission responsible annually for up to 5,000 new Hepatitis C virus infections among Egyptian children

Hepatitis C virus Credit: Flickr/AJC1Up to 5,000 new Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections occur in Egypt annually as a result of mother-to-child transmission, according to a new study by researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q), published in the journal Hepatology. Read more

Switch to two dose HPV vaccine schedule is cost effective

Lesion in human cervical epithelium infected with human papilloma virus (HPV16). Credit: MRC NIMR, Wellcome ImagesReducing the number of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine doses from three to two, is likely to be a cost effective move, according to research carried out by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Immunisation at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, in partnership with Public Health England. Read more