News from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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The key to finding and supporting children with disabilities

Cover of 'Using the Key Informant Method: A Working Guide'A new tool to help identify children with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries and ensure they get the support they need has been published. The free resource from researchers at the International Centre for Evidence in Disability at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine provides an evidence-based guide and materials to identify children in an affordable and reliable way using community volunteers. Read more

Domestic violence deters contraception

Condoms-300 Women who are abused by their partner or ex-partner are much less likely to use contraception, exposing them to sexually transmitted diseases and leading to more frequent unplanned pregnancies and abortions, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. Read more

Food back sorting

Greater use of food banks linked to higher unemployment, sanctions and cuts in welfare spending

The mass expansion of food banks across the UK is associated with cuts in spending on local services, welfare benefits and higher unemployment rates, a new study published in the BMJ has found. The study was carried out by researchers from Oxford University, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Liverpool University. They linked data covering 375 local authorities of official government data on welfare changes, sanction rates, and economic changes to food bank statistics from the Trussell Trust, the only source of routinely collected surveillance for the past decade. They found that food banks were more likely to open in local authorities with higher unemployment rates - and that greater welfare cuts increased the likelihood of a food bank opening. Read more

Image: Anne Mills lights the holy lamp at the launch of the CCCC in India. Credit: PHFI

First of its kind Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions launched in India

A new international partnership has launched in India to tackle the growing health crisis of chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and mental illness. The Centre for Control of Chronic Conditions (CCCC) is a partnership between four leading institutions: the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences New Delhi, Emory University, and the Public Health Foundation of India. The School’s Professor Vikram Patel is one of the Centre’s Directors. Read more

Dr Anna Goodman and Professor Dame Sally Macintyre at the ceremony (Dr Goodman wears the heirloom pendent). Credit: Kiki von Glasow, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre

Anna Goodman receives Suffrage Science award

The School’s Dr Anna Goodman has been recognised for her research at an event celebrating the achievements of leading women scientists. She was among 12 scientists in the fields of engineering, physical sciences and medicine, to be presented with a piece of Suffrage Science heirloom jewellery at the award ceremony, which took place at the Royal Society on International Women’s Day. The event was supported by the Medical Research Council, the Royal Society and L’Oréal. Read more

Image: Scanning electron micrograph of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, which cause TB. Credit: Flicker/NIAID.

How can we reach, treat and cure everyone with TB?

Progress against tuberculosis (TB) is being threatened by drug resistance and all patients with the disease should be tested to find out which treatments they respond to, according to a publication in the BMJ. As World TB Day approaches with this year’s theme of “reaching, treating and curing everyone”, David Moore, Professor of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and co-authors James Millard and Cesar Ugarte-Gil set out current challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and control of multidrug resistant tuberculosis globally. Read more

MRI scan of a person with ALS

Head trauma in sport and neurodegenerative disease

As the Six Nations rugby union championship continues amid much concern about concussions caused on the field, a team of leading epidemiologists have called for a major research effort to explore the links between head injuries in sport and long-term links to neurodegenerative disease. Writing in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, the Institute of Occupational Medicine and Queen Mary University of London say that while there is a great deal of evidence about the short-term effects of head injury, there is relatively little known about the long-term effects on cognitive function, dementia, Parkinson’s and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Read more

Prof Martin MvKee is awarded the 2015 Donabedian International Award

Martin McKee receives healthcare excellence award

Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the School, has been presented with the 2015 Donabedian International Award for his contribution to healthcare excellence at a ceremony in the Palau de la Música de Barcelona. Read more

Mother-to-child transmission responsible annually for up to 5,000 new Hepatitis C virus infections among Egyptian children

Hepatitis C virus Credit: Flickr/AJC1Up to 5,000 new Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections occur in Egypt annually as a result of mother-to-child transmission, according to a new study by researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q), published in the journal Hepatology. Read more