Author Archives: Teresa Cortes

Beth Sawyer brings science to the #BriSciFest2018

Beth and a team of volunteers from UCL, Reading and LSHTM took science to the streets of Brighton this weekend with a hands-on activity about the role of scientists in sport at #BriSciFest2018. “To coincide with the Winter Olympics, we … Continue reading

PhD studentship available

PhD studentship available within the MRC London Intercollegiate Doctoral Training Partnership (MRC LID) between The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and St. George’s University of London (SGUL) The PhD Project title is “Using functional genomics to understand … Continue reading

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Beth Sawyer gets the LSHTM small grant scheme in public engagement

Congratulations to Beth for securing funding for her public engagement project ” Secret Agents 005“! In collaboration with scientists from UCL, she will take science to the streets to inspire primary school children that careers in science are fun and … Continue reading

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New paper published in Scientific Reports

Our work ” Delayed effects of transcriptional responses in Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposed to nitric oxide suggest other mechanisms involved in survival” has been published in Scientific Reports. Bacterial adaptation to stress has been commonly studied in the context of transcriptional responses, … Continue reading

Postdoctoral position available

A postdoctoral research fellow position is now available in my group. Application closes on 12th May 2016. Click here to find out more!

Research Assistant position available

A Research Assistant position is now available in my research group. Click here to find out more!  

TB bacteria missing genetic signposts for proteins during latent infection

Read the full snippet at the Francis Crick Institute News here.

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