Author Archives: Laura Cornelsen

Sweet snacks vs sweet drinks – was SDIL badly targeted?

A recent study involving PHI|Lab‘s Laura Cornelsen and Richard Smith, published in the British Medical Journal modelled the effect of a 20% price increase on sweet snacks (chocolates, confectionery, biscuits) and found it could potentially lead to on average reduction … Continue reading

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What do people buy to eat out-of-home in Britain and where do they buy it?

This summary of our recent published study was written by 12-year old Sophie who was visiting LSHTM for a work experience. We at PHI|Lab think she has done a fantastic job cutting through an academic paper and pulling out the … Continue reading

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Should we have faith in ‘sin taxes’ to help tackle obesity crisis?

Last week Boris Johnson, our potential next Prime Minister, cast doubt on the effectiveness of health-related taxes on foods and beverages to help improve health and promised to put related existing policies and future plans under review. Is that really … Continue reading

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What processed foods do urban Indians buy?

  There have been raising concerns over the increasing consumption of industrially processed foods in low and middle income countries. These foods often increase the overall dietary content of sugars, saturated and trans-fat, salt and dietary energy density while decreasing … Continue reading

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Fat tax or thin subsidy?

Our health depends on what we eat and persistently high levels of obesity, increasing prevalence of diabetes and other non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, suggest that we need to improve our diets. This does not only mean reducing the … Continue reading

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