Public health and alcohol licensing workshop: recommendations for practice

Upcoming workshop on public health and alcohol licensing

We’re pleased to announce that the 2nd workshop for the Public Health and Alcohol Licensing study will be held on Monday 26th March, 10.00 – 13.00, at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Please join us to explore ways to strengthen public health practitioners’ contributions to alcohol licensing processes in local authorities.

The workshop will include:

– Summary and discussion of findings from the Public Health & Alcohol Licensing study

– Case examples of public health involvement in licensing processes

– Recommendations for strengthening public health licensing work

– Discussion of ways to support putting recommendations into practice

– Networking opportunities and lunch.

This workshop is aimed at Local Authority Public Health Practitioners and councillors, (alcohol leads and those involved in alcohol licensing), local Licensing Teams, Police Licensing Officers, and other Licensing Responsible Authorities and any other stakeholders with an interest in alcohol licensing.

The event will soon be open for registration. Please check back here from 22nd January for a link to the registration page.

Public health and alcohol licensing study – findings shared at public health conferences

Emerging findings from the Public Health and Alcohol Licensing (PHAL) study were shared at two key public health conferences in London in November 2017: the Lancet Public Health Science Annual Meeting, and the Annual Public Health Registrars’ Conference for London and the South East School of Public Health.

These conferences gave the study team valuable opportunities to discuss findings from the research with both academic and practitioner audiences. It proved very useful for prompting further thinking about the key learning from the study and how to strengthen public health contributions to alcohol licensing processes.

Take a look at the poster here:

PHAL Lancet PH conference 2017 poster

GSK Scholarships for students from sub-Saharan Africa for any LSHTM-based MSc – deadline 18 February

Three scholarships are offered to support the training and development of the next generation of leaders in global health, and strengthen the capacity of health systems and health-related research in Africa.

These highly competitive scholarships are available to applicants intending to study on a one-year, full-time, London-based MSc programme at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Award Details

Each scholarship will cover

  • tuition fees, including any mandatory field trip fees, and
  • a tax-free stipend (living allowance) of GBP16,750.00.

Eligibility Criteria

To be eligible for these scholarships, applicants must

  • be nationals of, and resident in, countries in sub-Saharan Africa; and
  • intend to return to sub-Saharan Africa on completion of their MSc year at the School; and
  • confirm in writing that they would not otherwise be able to pay for the proposed programme of study; and
  • meet the School’s minimum English language requirements; and
  • hold a first degree at either a first or upper second class equivalency level, and
  • hold an offer of admission for 2018-19 for one of the School’s 18 London-based MSc programmes of study.

Preference will be given to applicants who demonstrate (in their application documentation) the potential to make significant contributions to public health and/or health-related research in Africa.

 

The scholarship deadline is midnight (GMT) on Sunday 18 February 2018.

https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/fees-funding/gsk-scholarships-future-health-leaders-2018-19

 

 

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GSK scholarships for students from sub-Saharan Africa for MSc study at LSHTM – deadline 18 February

Three scholarships are offered to support the training and development of the next generation of leaders in global health, and strengthen the capacity of health systems and health-related research in Africa.

These highly competitive scholarships are available to applicants intending to study on a one-year, full-time, London-based MSc programme at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Award Details

Each scholarship will cover

  • tuition fees, including any mandatory field trip fees, and
  • a tax-free stipend (living allowance) of GBP16,750.00.

Eligibility Criteria

To be eligible for these scholarships, applicants must

  • be nationals of, and resident in, countries in sub-Saharan Africa; and
  • intend to return to sub-Saharan Africa on completion of their MSc year at the School; and
  • confirm in writing that they would not otherwise be able to pay for the proposed programme of study; and
  • meet the School’s minimum English language requirements; and
  • hold a first degree at either a first or upper second class equivalency level, and
  • hold an offer of admission for 2018-19 for one of the School’s 18 London-based MSc programmes of study.

Preference will be given to applicants who demonstrate (in their application documentation) the potential to make significant contributions to public health and/or health-related research in Africa.

 

The scholarship deadline is midnight (GMT) on Sunday 18 February 2018.

https://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/fees-funding/gsk-scholarships-future-health-leaders-2018-19

 

 

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8 – 14 January 2018

Peter Piot and Heidi Larson write an article for WIRED on how fake news and distrust of science could lead to global epidemics. They write: Vaccines are one of the most important scientific inventions of all time…Yet these vital public-health tools are under threat from growing public mistrust in immunisation and the rise of so-called ‘fake news’ drowning out expert voices.”

Heidi discusses how ‘fake news’ can affect health on BBC World Service Radio Newsday programme (from 45m15s). Heidi also joins a discussion on BBC Radio 4 PM (from 51m27s) about the possibility of introducing mandatory vaccines in the UK.

Jimmy Whitworth is quoted by the Press Association, following continued coverage of the spread of flu in the UK. Jimmy says: “Flu is very infectious and spreads through droplets in the air, so try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell…it is not too late to protect yourself, so get vaccinated now.” Adam Kucharski is also quoted on the flu by The Sun.

The Guardian publish a series of letters on health following a busy week for the NHS, including a letter from Nick Black. He says: “While increased funding for the NHS in England may prevent some of the problems being experienced…additional expenditure alone will not create the health and care system we need.”

Andy Haines writes a BMJ blog on how climate change must be reframed as a health issue: “In 2018 leadership by the health community can play a crucial role in mobilising support to build on the achievements of Paris and redouble efforts to protect the health of today’s and future generations.”

Martin McKee speaks to Deutsche Welle (Germany) about the future of the NHS in a post-Brexit world. On the economic impact, Martin says: “The pound is worth much less and the NHS of course is dependent on importing large amounts of pharmaceuticals and technology from elsewhere.”

Martin also writes a BMJ blog on what a ‘no-deal’ Brexit would mean for the UK.

Meenakshi Gautham is quoted by The Hindu (India) on the future of India’s rural healthcare needs in the coming decade: “We can’t ask populations here to wait for ten years till we produce enough doctors. Neither can we wait for rural areas to become urbanised.”

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GDPR for Research Data Management – workshop report

This blog post provides a brief overview of a workshop organised for the London Area Research Data (LARD) group on the implications of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) for research data management. The event was held at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine on November 17, 2017. It was organised by Gareth Knight (LSHTM), in conjunction with Helen Porter (SOAS) and Laurence Horton (LSE). A second write-up of the session has been produced by Laurence Horton.

Continue reading

ICED Newsletter: January 2018

Dear all,

Happy New Year! I hope that you had a wonderful and relaxing break.

The time is approaching for the international conference that we are co-hosting on Evidence in Global Disability and Health together with the Public Health Foundation of India on February 26-27, 2018 in Hyderabad, India. It is looking to be an exciting event with a range of interesting speakers from the region. Still time to register to attend!

Our MOOC (online course) on Global Disability and Health will also launch soon, and will be freely available for all! We have had a range of fabulous speakers and contributors helping to put it together – so thank you all for your help.

We had a bumper crop of papers at the end of last year, among them a large systematic review on poverty and disability, the first trial aiming to reduce violence perpetrated against children with disabilities, and an assessment of barriers to uptake of services by children with disabilities in Malawi. Find out more details of these, and other publications, below.

We are looking forward to working on exciting research projects in 2018. Among these, we are continuing with our evaluation of the impact of the Disability Allowance in the Maldives, developing a new rapid survey method for hearing loss, and expanding our participatory work with people with disabilities to develop a range of effective interventions.

I am very much looking forward to our continued interaction and partnership in 2018.

Best wishes,

Hannah Kuper

International Centre for Evidence in Disability, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

We have reached more than 1500 followers on Twitter – please follow us @ICED_LSHTM.

Publications

Poverty and disability are believed to be linked through a cycle, with one reinforcing the other. Our systematic review on Poverty and disability in low- and middle-income countries published last month includes 150 studies and found strong links between disability and the different measures of poverty. This relationship persisted when results were disaggregated by gender, measure of poverty used and impairment types. Moreover, the association became stronger in countries as they moved out of poverty and became more middle-income.

Trial data are notoriously lacking for interventions for people with disabilities. That is why we are particularly pleased to have collaborated on a trial conducted in Uganda to reduce physical violence toward primary school students with disabilities. The results showed that the “Good School Toolkit” was an effective intervention to reduce violence perpetrated by peers and school staff against with disabilities. 

Early detection and appropriate intervention is important for children with hearing impairment, but sadly often does not happen. We conducted a mixed methods study to explore reasons for low uptake of referrals for ear and hearing services for children in Malawi. Understanding these context specific barriers is important for designing appropriate interventions to increase uptake.

Other publications from our group that came out in December:

Focus On: Surveys

One of the key objectives of ICED is to generate more information on disability prevalence and impacts through conducting surveys.

In 2016, ICED led a National Survey of Disability in Guatemala, in collaboration with CBM, UNICEF Guatemala and the Guatemala National Council on Disability (CONADI). This survey was the first of its kind in the region, incorporating best-practice disability measurement tools and innovative mobile impairment screens. Overall, we screened over 13,000 people and found that about 10% had a disability.

In addition, the study included a nested case-control study to compare the life situation of people with and without disabilities in Guatemala. The results showed that people with disabilities experienced difficulties in participation, access to education and work, and poor health compared to those without disabilities. Qualitative interviews were also undertaken to probe the quantitative findings in more detail.

Upcoming Seminars and Events at LSHTM

  • January 10, 14:00-15:00, Tavistock Place, LG4. Upgrading seminar by Goli Hashemi. “Improving access to Primary Healthcare Services for People with Disabilities in Guatemala; Developing and pilot testing an intervention.”

Other Seminars of Interest:

  • 10 January 2018, 1-7pm Digital Content and Disability, Wilkins Building, UCL. Registration and refreshments in the South Cloisters; seminar in the Gustave Tuck Lecture Theatre

Work Experience Programme at ICED

We have launched our work experience programme for people with disabilities seeking experience in research. Please contact us if you would like to find out more about joining our team in this capacity: . 

Upcoming Conferences

We are making every effort to make all our research findings widely available, and have launched a Resource Webpage where you can find our key reports and manuals.

Have you seen this?

Great to see this editorial in Lancet Child and Adolescent Health “Securing the right to health for children with disabilities”

 

 

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1 – 7 January 2018

Steven Cummins is quoted by Reuters on a study linking smaller waistlines and lower BMI to living near physical activity facilities: “It is likely that communities without the neighbourhood resources needed to encourage a healthy lifestyle put their residents at a higher risk of obesity.” The article generates coverage in Business Insider, MSN.

Val Curtis speaks to the Daily Telegraph on the raw water health fad in California, which sees water taken directly from a natural source: “It’s all very well for one person to go and drink raw water but the problem is once you’ve drunk it, you could become an infectious problem to someone else.” Val is also quoted by the Daily Star.

Peter Piot is interviewed by Science on how Germany’s role in global and public health research is growing rapidly: “Germany is getting rid of its post–World War II inhibitions to finally play a role that is commensurate with its economic weight and its intellectual leadership.”

The Guardian cover a letter signed by LSHTM’s Martin McKee & Shah Ebrahim and UEA’s Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, urging the World Health Organization to rectify the issue of ageism by leaving out older people and dementia from its General Programme of Work.

There is wide UK coverage regarding the spread of flu around the country. Many outlets, including the Daily Mirror, The Independent, The Sun, Evening Standard and Metro, report the findings from Flusurvey showing that flu levels have risen. The project was set up in 2009 by the School in conjunction with Public Health England, and relies on people self-reporting the illness.

Mishal Khan is interviewed live on BBC World TV’s Newsday programme, discussing a variety of global health challenges for 2018: “Countries such as Pakistan, Myanmar, are investing less than 1% of their GDP on healthcare…there’s a lack of human resources, health facilities and people are having to turn to informal providers.”

Heidi Larson is quoted by CNN International on how countries around the world try to encourage vaccination: “Countries with high levels of schooling and good access to health services are associated with lower rates of positive sentiment, pointing to an emerging inverse relationship between vaccine sentiments and socio-economic status.”

Brendan Wren provides comment to the Daily Mail on research that indicates a sugar additive could be fuelling the rise of antimicrobial resistant ‘superbugs’: “This study provides a good example of how changes in human activity can have unintended consequences relating to the emergence and ultimately the global spread of an infectious agent.”

Andrew Bastawrous is interviewed by New Scientist on the mission to use technology that empowers healthcare providers to deliver quality eye care across the world: “If vision is on the [Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London] agenda, it could change the lives of millions, or even billions, of people.”

Ajay Aggarwal is quoted by the Daily Mail about robotic surgery on a study published in October that found surgical cancer centres invest heavily in unproven technologies to attract patients: “NHS trusts appear to have bought the robots not because they are better, but because they pull in more customers.”

VICE report a new School-led study that found providing e-STI testing could increase the number of people being tested among high-risk groups.